Category Archives: Political Marketing

Hitting them where it hurts

In this episode of Listen to this, we look into how young people can change the course of history, how advertisers should probably choose where to put their money, and the ins and outs of ethical behaviour in marketing. Listen … Continue reading

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The rise of American authoritarianism

Such an interesting thesis by Amanda Taub on Vox, and so much more cogent than the explanation for the current political climate as simply “anger”. This could be just as relevant for Australia (the rise of the ultra-conservative wing of … Continue reading

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Political advertising: Is the truth important?

In a bid to capture the undecided voter, the Palmer United Party is outspending Liberal and Labor in advertising ahead of the WA Senate re-election. There’s been criticism about the accuracy of the content – especially the assertion that Mr … Continue reading

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Are doubts about consumer confidence justified?

Consumer confidence has fallen by 8.3% to its lowest level in two years, according to the Westpac-Melbourne Institute Consumer Sentiment Index. The drop has been connected to speculation about the impact of the carbon tax, with Treasurer Wayne Swan calling … Continue reading

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Fantastical Tony and his magical mystery team

Politics is a tricky business. Being in government is even trickier. But it should be pretty simple. It’s like any other business, isn’t it? It’s all just marketing. You find out what they want, you tell them what you’re going … Continue reading

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The budget… whatever

There is a sublime moment in the first series of “The Thick of It”, the brilliant British comedy TV series that satirised the inner workings of modern government, where the Minister for Social Affairs and Citizenship, Hugh Abbot, and the … Continue reading

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Nose candy and dickheads… controversial, but will they change behaviour?

Two social marketing campaigns have caused a bit of controversy in Australia in the past week or so. In Victoria, VicRoads has launched their “Don’t be a Dickhead” campaign, while in NSW, the Department of Health’s anti-drug educational campaign has sparked … Continue reading

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Post hoc, ergo, propter hoc

“After it, therefore, because of it” The post-hoc fallacy is a classic mind-trick. Because one thing comes after another, we assume that the first thing caused the other. But this is rarely the case – a rooster crows, and the … Continue reading

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Politics and Brands: UPDATE – The Costello Factor

Until recently, there have been two areas where John Howard’s brand has taking a beating. Firstly, the Liberal party has been desperately trying to take control of the agenda, but it might be the case that the Rudd brand has … Continue reading

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Politics and branding

Branding in politics has always been around. The Nazi Party, New Labour (in the UK), and the Romans all used a brand, image, or logo, and they used branding tools to communicate particular values, and in some cases to say … Continue reading

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